Dog Nutrition
Dog Nutrition | Puppy Vs Adult Dog Food |

Puppy Vs Adult Dog Food

By DogNutrition.Com

Marketers can do a lot of hyping such as putting the words "recommended by veterinarians" on the dog food label. However due to the fact that there is no guideline for that usage of the term, it becomes meaningless. For example, even if one veterinarian out of a million recommends it; it can still be labeled as "recommended by veterinarians".

However any dog foods labeled as "complete and balanced" must meet standards established by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO). Which means that before any marketer can put the term “complete and balanced” on the label. They must pass a test with a set guideline. Looking at the guideline table, you can clearly see that there is a difference between puppy "growth and reproduction" and adult "maintenance" dog food.

So the next time you go shopping for dog food. Don't just grab the cheapest one. If you have a puppy, get him the growth one and vice versa for an adult. However keep in mind that giving an adult puppy food is not often a good idea due to the increase in protein. Please check with your vet before making any changes in your dog's diet.

TABLE 1 -- AAFCO Dog Food Nutrient Profilesa

Nutrient

Units
DM Basis

Growth and
Reproduction
Minimum

Adult
Maintenance
Minimum

Maximum

Protein

%

22.0

18.0


Arginine

%

0.62

0.51


Histidine

%

0.22

0.18


Isoleucine

%

0.45

0.37


Leucine

%

0.72

0.59


Lysine

%

0.77

0.63


Methionine-cystine

%

0.53

0.43


Phenylalanine-tyrosine

%

0.89

0.73


Threonine

%

0.58

0.48


Tryptophan

%

0.20

0.16


Valine

%

0.48

0.39


Fatb

%

8.0

5.0


Linoleic acid

%

1.0

1.0


Minerals

Calcium

%

1.0

0.6

2.5

Phosphorus

%

0.8

0.5

1.6

Ca:P ratio


1:1

1:1

2:1

Potassium

%

0.6

0.6


Sodium

%

0.3

0.06


Chloride

%

0.45

0.09


Magnesium

%

0.04

0.04

0.3

Ironc

mg/kg

80.0

80.0

3000.0

Copperd

mg/kg

7.3

7.3

250.0

Manganese

mg/kg

5.0

5.0


Zinc

mg/kg

120.0

120.0

1000.0

Iodine

mg/kg

1.5

1.5

50.0

Selenium

mg/kg

0.11

0.11

2.0

Vitamins

Vitamin A

IU/kg

5000.0

5000.0

250000.0

Vitamin D

IU/kg

500.0

500.0

5000.0

Vitamin E

IU/kg

50.0

50.0

1000.0

Thiaminee

mg/kg

1.0

1.0


Riboflavin

mg/kg

2.2

2.2


Pantothenic acid

mg/kg

10.0

10.0


Niacin

mg/kg

11.4

11.4


Pyridoxine

mg/kg

1.0

1.0


Folic Acid

mg/kg

0.18

0.18


Vitamin B12

mg/kg

0.022

0.022


Choline

mg/kg

1200.0

1200.0


a Presumes an energy density of 3.5 kcal ME/g DM, based on the "modified Atwater" values of 3.5, 8.5, and 3.5 kcal/g for protein, fat, and carbohydrate (nitrogen-free extract, NFE), respectively. Rations greater than 4.0 kcal/g should be corrected for energy density; rations less than 3.5 kcal/g should not be corrected for energy.

b Although a true requirement for fat per se has not been established, the minimum level was based on recognition of fat as a source of essential fatty acids, as a carrier of fat-soluble vitamins, to enhance palatability, and to supply an adequate caloric density.

c Because of very poor bioavailability, iron from carbonate or oxide sources that are added to the diet should not be considered as components in meeting the minimum nutrient level.

d Because of very poor bioavailability, copper from oxide sources that are added to the diet should not be considered as components in meeting the minimum nutrient level.

e Because processing may destroy up to 90 percent of the thiamine in the diet, allowance in formulation should be made to ensure the minimum nutrient level is met after processing.

 

If you want to learn more about Dog Food Guidelines - You can reach the FDA at
Center For Veterinary Medicine

To learn more about dog nutrition - Click Here


 
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